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More than 20 per cent of bisexual people reported being victims of sexual assault at work

New figures found bisexual people experience even higher levels of sexual harassment than other LGBTQ people in some areas

2019-09-23

Words: Steve Brown

Around one in five bisexual people have reported being victims of sexual assault at work.

According to new figures published by the TUC on Bi Visibility Day (September 23), more than 20 per cent of bisexual people reported they have been sexually assault at work.

Seven in 10 (71 per cent) of people also reported they had experience sexual harassment in the workplace.

Back in May, the TUC published the first every study into sexual harassment of LGBTQ people across Great Britain and found that around 68 per cent had been sexually harassed at work.

But to mark Bi Visibility Day, figures show that bisexual people experience even higher levels of sexual harassment than other LGBTQ people in some areas.

The poll found that bisexual people were more likely to experience unwanted touching (30 per cent) and sexual assault (21 per cent) at work compared to other LGBTQ  people.

One in nine people admitted they had been seriously assaulted or raped at work.

Around 38 per cent of people who were touched inappropriately were bisexual woman, compared to just 23 per cent of bi men.

According to the new study, one in five bi men and women reported their sexual assault as unwanted touching of breasts, buttocks or genitals or attempts at kissing.

Around 10 per cent of both bi men and women said they were sexually assaulted or raped at work.

Nearly 24 per cent of those who experienced unwanted sexual incident in the workplace said the incident caused them to leave or want to leave their job.

12 per cent of people actually left their job as a result and around 24 per cent reported a detrimental impact on their health.

The TUC research shows that these experiences contribute to a workplace where more than two in five (42 per cent) bisexual people do not feel able to be open with anyone at work about their sexual orientation.

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “Bisexual people should feel safe and supported at work, but instead they’re experiencing shocking levels of sexual harassment, with significant impacts on their health and well-being.

“Sexual harassment has no place in a modern workplace – or in wider society.

“The government needs to change the law to put the responsibility for preventing harassment on employers, not victims.

“And anyone worried about sexual harassment at work should join a union.”