entertainment

George Michael's private art collection sells for £9.3million at auction

The proceeds will be used to carry on the late star's philanthropic work.

2019-03-15

George Michael's private art collection has sold for almost £9.3 million at auction, two years after the musician's death at the age of 53.

The 'Outside' singer's personal collection of works by artists including Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin was auctioned at Christie's in London on Thursday (14 March) following a week-long public exhibition which attracted more than 12,000 visitors. 

100% of the pieces on display were sold, with the proceeds going towards carrying on the late musician's philanthropic work.

The highest price was for Damien Hirst's 2006 work 'The Incomplete Truth', which consists of a dover preserved in formaldehyde and which sold for £911,250.

'The Incomplete Truth' by Damien Hirst

As well as pieces by the famed Young British Art movement, Michael's private art collection included personal pieces which drew upon the star's sexuality and keen sense of humour.

Among the lots auctioned were three works by Irish artist Michael Craig-Martin that referenced Michael's 1998 arrest for soliciting in a public toilet. Untitled (SEX), Untitled (GOD), (pictured at top pf page) and Handcuffs sold for £125,000, £40,000 and £112,500 respectively.

Untitled (SEX) and Handcuffs by Michael Craig-Martin

George Michael’s Trustees remarked: “Philanthropic work was hugely important for George during his lifetime and it was his wish that this work would continue after his passing.

"We are delighted with the outcome of the evening sale, raising £9,264,000 / $12,302,590 / €10,848,145."

The exhibitiona at Christie's was visited by Michael's ex-boyfrined Kenny Goss, 60, who dated the singer for 13 years between 1996 until 2009.

'George Loves Kenny' by Tracey Emin

The Texas art dealer was the subject of one of the works on display; a piece by Tracey Emin which illuminates the words 'George Loves Kenny' in neon lighting.

Commissioned by George in 2007, it sold for £280,000 ($370,900), more than quadruple pre-sale estimate of £60,000.